Your question: Why does my 18 month old walk on her tippy toes?

Is it normal for a toddler to walk on tippy toes?

Walking on the toes or the balls of the feet, also known as toe walking, is fairly common in children who are just beginning to walk. Most children outgrow it. Kids who continue toe walking beyond the toddler years often do so out of habit.

When should I worry about toe walking?

Toe walking on its own is usually not a cause for concern, especially if a child is otherwise growing and developing normally. If toe walking occurs in addition to any of the following, consult a pediatrician: Muscle stiffness, especially in the legs or ankles. Frequent stumbling or general incoordination.

Should my 17 month old walk on tiptoes?

Around the time children learn to walk, roughly any time between 8 and 18 months, they often have an unsteady gait, walk with their legs bowed and feet far apart, and sometimes prefer to walk on their tiptoes. The most common reason for walking on tiptoes is simply out of habit and because they CAN do it.

Why does my 20 month old walk on his toes?

What can cause persistent toe walking? Certain underlying health, medical or developmental conditions can cause a child to walk on their toes. These conditions include cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, and autism spectrum disorder. These conditions are sometimes diagnosed before the child starts walking.

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What are the signs of autism in a 1 year old?

Toddlers between 12-24 months at risk for an ASD MIGHT:

  • Talk or babble in a voice with an unusual tone.
  • Display unusual sensory sensitivities.
  • Carry around objects for extended periods of time.
  • Display unusual body or hand movements.
  • Play with toys in an unusual manner.

Is walking on your tippy toes bad?

Long-term effects of toe walking, if left untreated

Many children who consistently walk on their tip-toes since establishing independent ambulation, may develop foot deformities as early as the age of four. These children may demonstrate ankle range of motion restrictions, impaired balance and poor postural alignment.